Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-019-2222-5
Title: Acute human bocavirus 1 infection in child with life-threatening bilateral bronchiolitis and right-sided pneumonia : a case report
Authors: Ziemele, Inga
Xu, Man
Vilmane, Anda
Rasa-Dzelzkaleja, Santa
Hedman, Lea
Hedman, Klaus
Söderlund-Venermo, Maria
Nora-Krukle, Zaiga
Murovska, Modra
Gardovska, Dace
Department of Paediatrics
Institute of Microbiology and Virology
Keywords: Acute bronchiolitis;Children;Human bocavirus 1;Lower respiratory tract infection;Medicine(all);3.1 Basic medicine;3.2 Clinical medicine;1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database
Issue Date: 14-Sep-2019
Citation: Ziemele , I , Xu , M , Vilmane , A , Rasa-Dzelzkaleja , S , Hedman , L , Hedman , K , Söderlund-Venermo , M , Nora-Krukle , Z , Murovska , M & Gardovska , D 2019 , ' Acute human bocavirus 1 infection in child with life-threatening bilateral bronchiolitis and right-sided pneumonia : a case report ' , Journal of Medical Case Reports , vol. 13 , no. 1 , pp. 290 . https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-019-2222-5
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Human bocavirus 1 is a commonly detected human parvovirus. Many studies have shown human bocavirus 1 as a pathogen in association with acute respiratory tract infections in children. However, because human bocavirus 1 persists in the upper airways for extensive time periods after acute infection, the definition and diagnostics of acute human bocavirus 1 infection is challenging. Until now, detection of human bocavirus 1 exclusively, high viral load in respiratory samples, and viremia have been associated with a clinical picture of acute respiratory illness. There are no studies showing detection of human bocavirus 1 messenger ribonucleic acid in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a diagnostic marker for acute lower respiratory tract infection. CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 17-month-old Latvian boy who presented in intensive care unit with acute bilateral bronchiolitis, with a history of rhinorrhea and cough for 6 days and fever for the last 2 days prior to admission, followed by severe respiratory distress and tracheal intubation. Human bocavirus 1 was the only respiratory virus detected by a qualitative multiplex polymerase chain reaction panel. For the diagnosis of acute human bocavirus 1 infection, both molecular and serological approaches were used. Human bocavirus 1 deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected simultaneously in nasopharyngeal aspirate, stool, and blood, as well as in the corresponding cell-free blood plasma by qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, revealing high DNA-copy numbers in nasopharyngeal aspirate and stool. Despite a low-load viremia, human bocavirus 1 messenger ribonucleic acid was found in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells. For detection of human bocavirus 1-specific antibodies, non-competitive immunoglobulin M and competitive immunoglobulin G enzyme immunoassays were used. The plasma was positive for both human bocavirus 1-specific immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of human bocavirus 1 genomic DNA in blood plasma and human bocavirus 1 messenger ribonucleic acid in peripheral blood mononuclear cells together with human bocavirus 1-specific immunoglobulin M are markers of acute human bocavirus 1 infection that may cause life-threatening acute bronchiolitis.
Description: Copyright: This record is sourced from MEDLINE/PubMed, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1186/s13256-019-2222-5
ISSN: 1752-1947
Appears in Collections:Research outputs from Pure / Zinātniskās darbības rezultāti no ZDIS Pure

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